Galerie Ron Mandos presents Static Mythologies, an exhibition with new works by Daniel Arsham. The artist is well-known for his ‘fictional archaeology’, sculptures depicting iconic cultural objects from our time, turned into relics.

Static Mythologies

The artist casts them in geological substances, such as volcanic ash, rose quartz, obsidian and glacial rock. With their eroded, fossilised look, the works have been referred to as ‘catalysts for the 21st century mind to travel backwards and forwards at once’. The artist draws inspiration from his childhood memories, American pop culture, his research at NASA laboratories and his visits to the Hellenic wing of the Metropolitan Museum.

COURTESY OF GALERIE RON MANDOS. COPYRIGHT © THE ARTIST

About the Installation

The immersive installation Lunar Garden, one of Arsham’s signature architectural interventions, has seen its European premier at Galerie Ron Mandos. For his Static Mythologies exhibition Arsham was inspired by his visits to Kyoto’s famous karesansui, or Zen gardens.

COURTESY OF GALERIE RON MANDOS. COPYRIGHT © THE ARTIST

‘Whenever I visit them, they look as if time hasn’t passed. But in fact they are heavily maintained by the monks. In my works, too, this balance between permanence and impermanence is very important’. – Daniel Arsham

PHOTO BY OBJEKT©

Lunar Garden

The artist views Lunar Garden as an ethereal space to think about the passing of time, which is a concept central to all of his works. For his eroded sculptures he carefully selected items that speak to a broad audience, such as magazine covers and objects used in popular sports.

Sculptures

New to Arsham’s vocabulary of forms are his wrapped sculptures. These works refer to an art historical context: they are reminiscent of the wet drapery technique in Ancient Greek sculpture, but also of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s iconic wrapped sculptures. The wrapping of objects was also used by Surrealists such as Man Ray, whose L’Enigme d’Isidore Ducasse (1920) inspired Arsham to apply concealing as a means to reveal an uncanny state within the object.

Connecting Time

Besides his exhibition at Gallery Ron Mandos, Arsham also exhibites ‘Connecting Time’ in Moco Museum Amsterdam where he merged past, present and future in fictitious archaeology. Connecting Time has been realized in partnership with Galerie Perrotin and Galerie Ron Mandos

Stepping inside the Moco Museum in the coming months, is like stepping into a twisted reality. Eleven spaces at the museum are transformed in order to merge past, present and future and immerse visitors in an absurd experience. His solo exhibition ‘Connecting Time’ encompasses several disciplines, including architecture, design, fashion, sculpture, film, and fine art. The Moco Museum is the first Dutch establishment to exhibit Arsham’s work, which will be on display until the end of September 2019.

ONE OF THE ELEVEN SPACES AT MOCO MUSEUM

The Artist

Daniel Arsham (United States, 1980) is a New York-based artist whom achieved his first success as a stage designer, Arsham and his architectural firm Snarkitecture quickly began collaborating with renowned artists, musicians, designers and brands. A central element in Arsham’s work is the concept of fictional archaeology. He creates ambiguous spaces and situations, and conflates past, present and future by presenting millennial-era objects in calcified form. He is also interested in experimenting with

DANIEL ARSHAM IN FRONT OF HIS CREATION

the timelessness of symbolic objects and customs across different cultures. Arsham has received prestigious international awards for his work, which has been shown at MoMA PS1 in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami, the Athens Biennale, the New Museum in New York, the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, the SCAD Museum of Art, Carré d’Art de Nîmes and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia, among others.