New York’s new Phase II of the waterfront park Hunter’s Point South in Long Island City, designed by SWA/BALSLEY in collaboration with WEISS/MANFREDI and ARUP, had opened this summer.

PHASE II

Located adjacent to the City’s largest affordable housing development, the park’s integrated design weaves together infrastructure, landscape, architecture, and art, and presents a new model of urban ecology and innovative sustainable design.

The completion of Phase II marks the realization of the larger park master plan, which first welcomed the public in 2013 with the completion of Phase I. 

The Industrial Peninsula

The industrial peninsula – one of the parks major design features – has been created to feel like New York City’s newest ‘island’, surrounded by salt marsh, where one can find quiet recreation and contemplation.

Visitors are invited to wander through a series of meandering trails and well-chosen vistas, establishing a multi-layered recreational and cultural destination as well as environmental habitat. Other highlights include a 30-foot-high cantilevered platform that offers panoramic views of Manhattan, exercise and picnic terraces, and a kayak launch. 

Luminenscence

The park features a land art installation – Luminescence – by Nobuho Nagasawa, depicting the phases of the moon with glowing six-foot discs.

For many early civilizations, and to this day, the phases of the moon have been a measurement of time. An ancient custom still remaining in many of the world’s lunar calendars is a day to observe the moon. “Luminescence” consists of seven sculptures that emulate the seven phases of the moon.

Arranged in a semi-circular configuration, the work creates a sensory experience that metaphorically and poetically links to the tidal rhythm of the adjacent East River. Using NASA’s topographic survey data collected by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the 6-ft diameter domes depict stylized but accurate representations of the moon’s craters, mountains, and valleys.

Photography: Albert Vecerka,  David Lloyd, Bill Tatham